Association between early essential newborn care and breastfeeding outcomes in eight countries in Asia and the Pacific: a cross-sectional observational -study

Li Z, Mannava P, Murray JCS Western Pacific Region Early Essential Newborn Care Working Group, et al; BMJ Global Health 2020;5:e002581.

Abstract

Objective To explore the association between early essential newborn care (EENC) policy, practice and environmental interventions and breastfeeding outcomes.

Design Cross-sectional observational study.

Setting 150 national, provincial and district hospitals implementing EENC in eight countries in East Asia and the Pacific.

Participants 1383 maternal interviews, chart reviews and environmental assessments during 2016 and 2017.

Main outcome measures Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF), that is, feeding only breastmilk without other food or fluids since birth and before discharge, and, early breastfeeding initiation, that is, during skin-to-skin contact (SSC) with the mother without separation.

Results Fifty-nine per cent of newborns initiated breastfeeding early and 83.5% were EBF. Duration of SSC showed a strong dose–response relationship with early breastfeeding initiation. SSC of at least 90 min was associated with 368.81 (95% CI 88.76 to 1532.38, p<0.001) times higher early breastfeeding. EBF was significantly associated with SSC duration of 30–59 min (OR 3.54, 95% CI 1.88 to 6.66, p<0.001), 60–89 min (OR 5.61, 95% CI 2.51 to 12.58, p<0.001) and at least 90 min (OR 3.78, 95% CI 2.12 to 6.74, p<0.001) regardless of delivery mode. Non-supine position (OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.90 to 4.11, p<0.001), rooming-in (OR 5.85, 95% CI 3.46 to 9.88, p

Conclusion EENC policy, practice and environmental interventions were associated with breastfeeding outcomes. To maximise the likelihood of early and EBF, newborns, regardless of delivery mode, should receive immediate and uninterrupted SSC for at least 90 min.

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